Residential & Business Security Systems in Medfield, MA

Overview

Welcome to Alarm New England's business and home security page for Medfield, Massachusetts. This informational page provides important crime data along with additional information for those living in or considering moving to Medfield.

Population: 12,888
Number of Households: 4,150
County: Norfolk
ZIP Codes: 02052

Medfield Business and Home Security Facts

Based in New England since 1972, we’ve worked in the Medfield area for decades. We know the landscape and we have good relationships with local authorities. Our team of dedicated employees live in the communities we serve. Our customers are our neighbors.

Medfield is safer than 98% of the towns and cities in the United States. It's astonishingly low crime rate sits at 0.23 per 1000 residents. Your chances of falling victim to a violent crime in Midfield is 1 in 10000. Medfield also holds a property crime rate of less than 1 per 1000 people.

History of Medfield

Medfield has been around since the period of colonization under the name Neponset Land. After the invasion of the British and the death of the territory leader Chickatabot in a smallpox epidemic in 1633, Neponset Land was unclaimed for about fifty years. It took that same amount of time for Chickatabot's grandchild Josias Wampatuck to claim a land deed on the borders of Neponset Land. Medfield was settled in 1649 by residents from the old Neponset Land and then incorporated under Massachusetts law two years later in 1651.

The late Reverend Ralph Wheelock holds the credit for founding Medfield. He later went on to become the very first headmaster of the town school. Today, an elementary school in Medfield bears his name.

In the eighteen hundreds, Medfield built up a reputation as an industrial settlement. Around this period, straw hats and bonnets were manufactured in what is known today as the Lowell Mason house. By the 1950s, Medfield's E.V Mitchell factory was the second biggest felt and straw hat factory in the United States.

Medfield has also dabbled in the manufacturing of commodities such as forks, boots, wire, and cut nails. In fact, Baker-Cushman, a company that specialized in the sale of carriages sold its products all over New England.

Things to See and Do in Medfield

Medfield is home to quite a number of historical monuments and houses. Red Top is one of Medfield's top attractions for tourists. Designated a national landmark, Red Top is associated with writer William Howells. Red Top is a shingle design house located in Somerset Street. The house was designed by William Howell's brother-in-law; a man named William Rutherford.

Medfield is also the location of the famous Boston Massachusetts Temple. It is the 100th temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). The Boston Massachusetts Temple is notable as it was the last temple built to attain LDS church's goal of building 100 temples. Finished with white granite, the beautiful, sprawling structure sits on a total of 69,600 square feet. Medfield also attracts visitors to its famous Wellington Hill Railroad Station which was built in 1840.

Lastly, visitors pour in droves to the William Flagg Homer House. The Homer House, as it often referred to in informal circles, served as an inspiration for many of American landscape artist Homer Winslow's earlier paintings and illustrations in the eighteen-sixties. The house was purchased by the Medfield Women's club in 1923, saving it from being destroyed.

Notable Residents

Hannah Adams was a famous Christian author. Born in Medfield, Hannah Adams was the very first female writer who made it professionally.

On the music side of things, Matthew Aucoin an award-winning pianist, conductor and composer known for his operas was born in Medfield. He has received commissions from Carnegie Hall and Harvard University.

Medfield was also the birthplace of Jerry Bergonzi, a tenor saxophonist who is renowned as the author of the Inside Improvisation book series for music.

Local Resources

Contact Information


Sales:
(857) 445-4010

Service/Billing:
(800) 322-3500

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