Residential & Business Security Systems in Gloucester, MA

Overview

Welcome to Alarm New England's business and home security page for Gloucester, Massachusetts. This informational page provides important crime data along with additional information for those living in or considering moving to Gloucester.

Population: 29,043
Number of Households 12,070
County: Essex
ZIP Codes: 01930, 01931

Gloucester Business and Home Security Facts

The town of Gloucester is safer than 67% of the towns and cities in the US when all population sizes are considered. For a person that lives in Gloucester, the chance of becoming a victim of crime is 1% (1 out of 98). Compared to the average chance of 1 out of 35 across the entire US, Gloucester is a safe town and ranked among the 100 safest towns in the US.

In Massachusetts, the crime rate of Gloucester is lower than 50% of the communities. In comparison with other communities that have a similar population size across the US, Gloucester is safer.

The rate of violent crime in Gloucester is higher than most towns and communities of all population sizes in the US. The probability that a resident of Gloucester will be a victim of a crime such as aggravated assault, rape, armed robbery or murder is 0.2% (1 out of 408), equivalent to 2 people for every one thousand residents.

The rate of property crime in Gloucester is below the average obtainable across the towns and cities in the US. The chance of becoming a victim of property crimes in Gloucester is 0.8% (1 out of 130).

History of Gloucester

In 1623, some men from Dorchester embarked on an expedition led by James I of Scotland. The expedition led them to Cape Ann where they founded Gloucester. The town was reportedly abandoned between 1626 and the late 1630s, till it was gradually resettled thereafter.

In 1624, Gloucester was officially incorporated as a town. The name of the town was derived from the Southwestern England city of Gloucester. As one of the first places in the Manchester Bay Colony to be settled in by the English, fishing was one of the settlers’ main activities. The fishing activities were done close to the shore.

Other activities included logging and farming. However, the poor soils and presence of rocks in the Cape Ann area did not support large-scale farming, so the bulk of population depended on subsistence farm produce for sustenance.

The early settlers of Gloucester cleared a considerable portion of the Cape Ann forest and used the cleared land for their farms and pasture. The timber gotten from the forest was used for construction.

Interesting Things to See and Do in Gloucester

The town of Gloucester has many beaches and attractive sites which makes it an awesome place to visit. Some of the significant sites and historic buildings in Gloucester are listed on the US National Register of Historic Places.

In Gloucester, the only surviving civic element of the colonial origin of the village of Centerville is the Ancient Burying Ground. The cemetery is the oldest cemetery in the village and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places (1987).

Lovers of museum visits would find Gloucester a favorable destination. The town has several museums such as the John F. Kennedy Museum, Cahoon Museum of Art, US Coast Guard Museum etc.

The US Coast Guard Museum gives a great account of the occurrences on the waters off of Cape Cod and the role that the US Coast Guard played in these events. Besides, some of the equipment used during such happenings are also featured in the museum.
The Sturgis Library in Gloucester is a building that offers so much learning and fabulous books. Although small, the library is quaint.

Notable Residents

Many notable sculptors lived and worked in Gloucester. Some of them include Anna Hyatt Huntington, George Aarons, Paul Manship, Charles Grafly and George Demetrios.

The first popular painter in Gloucester was Fitz Henry Lane (also born in Gloucester). Till date, his house remains on the Gloucester waterfront and his works (40 paintings and 100 drawings) are in the Cape Ann Museum.

Local Resources

Contact Information


Sales:
(857) 445-4010

Service/Billing:
(800) 322-3500

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